Tag archives: reading news

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Children’s and young people’s reading – latest news and articles

Wilstead booksSome of the wonderful books we explored on an inset I gave on Monday on reading for pleasure. (Perfect topic for the start of the academic year.)

Lots of news and articles about children’s reading came out over the summer. Do hope this round-up is useful.

An American study shows that the benefits of reading to babies last for years.

New research shows the importance of oral vocabulary for reading: children find it easier to read words they have heard before, even if they’ve never seen them written down.

I was very interested to read Kate Nation’s views on the necessity for good comprehension strategies to complement phonics teaching in early years.

Primary teachers, do also look at this helpful, nuanced review of the relative merits of whole class reading teaching and guided reading. (My last news round-up has links to a couple of other valuable articles on this topic.)

Lots of good ideas in ‘Six steps to create a reading culture in your school’. Great to see school libraries and librarians (appropriately) valued.

‘What works for getting kids to enjoy reading’ has some interesting data and ideas, particularly about rewards for reading and easy access to books.

This useful blog on reading interventions argues that all interventions must be appropriate to the individual, for instance that a phonics-based approach will not help a successful decoder who struggles with comprehension.

Finally, an intriguing discovery: only human protagonists in children’s books impact on children’s social behaviour, not animal ones.

 

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

A round-up of recent news and articles about children’s and young people’s reading

manchester girl readingI’ve always loved the Reading Girl statue by Giovanni Ciniselli in Manchester Central Library. The perfect illustration for my latest haul of children’s reading news.

The National Literacy Trust’s important annual literacy survey has just been published. Great to see that rates of reading for pleasure continue to rise. Sadly, though, 40% of 8-18 year-olds enjoy reading little or not at all, with significantly more boys than girls in this camp, far more secondary age students than key stage 2 pupils, and more pupils from white ethnic backgrounds than other ethnic backgrounds. Pupils who enjoy reading were found, not surprisingly, to spend more time reading, to read more widely, to have higher reading scores and better comprehension.

Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boost. Shared book-reading that begins soon after birth may translate into higher language and vocabulary skills before elementary school, according to US research.

Children’s reading improves if parents have positive views about their potential and are given ways to support reading effectively at home. A new survey shows big benefits to funding parental support for reading, especially for boys.

There are lots of excellent tips for raising a reader from the New York Times.

Do listen to Dr Vivienne Smith talking about why reading is important, not least for empathy and mental health.

Author and former teacher Jo Cotterill has great ideas for developing reading for pleasure. I also recommend this Scottish Book Trust blog on the subject.

A tweet by year 5 teacher Lauren Butterworth demonstrates how important it is to model reading behaviour: ‘The biggest influence on reading for pleasure in my class has been me reading – the kids love asking me questions.’

‘The essential components of a KS2 reading scheme’ is full of valuable pointers. The final essential on the list? A teacher who loves reading.

One of my greatest joys at primary school was when teachers read to us, and I loved it especially when it happened outside. A recent article explores the value of taking reading lessons into the open air.

Many primary schools are moving away from the carousel guided reading model. For teachers looking for guidance on this ‘How I teach whole class reading’ is useful, as is ‘ How to switch to whole class guided reading’.

Boys’ reading attainment is frequently addressed. A recent article suggests that girls’ reading problems often fall beneath the radar.

An anonymous English teacher ponders on the implications of the lack of reading by English teachers. It’s well worth reading the comments too, and this response from another English teacher.

New research demonstrates that children’s learning and comprehension do not differ between printed and digital books. Comprehension is dependent on content, not medium.

‘Inappropriate content’ is a useful discussion between an author and a bookseller about why age banding children’s books is unhelpful.

Last but definitely not least, an inspiring animation from We Love Reading.

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Recent news and articles about children’s and young people’s reading

IMG_3406I love this picture, Jeune fille lisant by Simon Simon-Auguste, which I came across in the art gallery in Troyes in France last summer. It seems the perfect illustration for my latest round-up of reading news.

‘How reading impacts your kid’s brain’ pulls together research on the benefits of reading for brain development, mental health and even life expectancy.

‘Learning to read is a complex process, so we need to make sure that it isn’t reduced to one strategy’ identifies methods for helping young children engage with the written word.

There are more good ideas for making reading fun in the early years in ‘Making storytime special.’

In ‘Why whole-class reading beats a carousel – and seven ways to ensure it is successful’ a KS2 teacher explains his preference for whole-class reading sessions over guided reading, and lists key ingredients for making them work.

A US study demonstrates that classroom book collections arranged by topic rather than by level increase children’s reading skills, motivation and enjoyment.

The International Literacy Association’s annual What’s Hot in Literacy survey highlights significant mismatches between what is currently hot in literacy teaching and what should be.

New research indicates that print books remain more popular with children than reading from screens. The study also discovered that the more devices a child has access to, the less they read.

‘Print matters’ explores the reasons for children’s and families’ preference for print over digital reading. Parents and children like the physicality of printed books and enjoy the emotional closeness of sharing them.

However, the way children read changes with age. Whereas 9-12 year-olds read offline for twice as long as online, 13-16 year-olds spend double the amount of time reading online, according to a new Childwise report. The report also found that a third of 15-16 year-olds say they never read, compared to 5% of 9-10 year-olds, and that boys are almost twice as likely never to read as girls (20%, compared to 11%).

I was delighted by a headteacher’s piece on why she asks interviewees what they are reading. ‘I need teachers who have a rich hinterland, and who can encourage reading in children. I want them to have read enough books not to be embarrassed when faced with a class reader. I want them to be keen to enter another world for a bit, and I want them to do it for themselves.’

Finally, do read this heart-warming letter from teacher Jon Biddle to his class.

Monday, 9 January 2017

Children’s and young people’s reading – latest research and articles

Time for one of my regular round-ups of reading news. But first a wonderful quote from out-going US President Barack Obama: ‘Reading is important. If you know how to read, then the whole world opens up to you.’

reading-breakfast-summer-lane-primary-school-2

The Education Endowment Foundation has found that primary school breakfast clubs boost reading, writing and maths. Thank you to Summer Lane Primary School for the photo of one of their very successful family reading breakfasts.

Read On Get On has published an important strategy, aimed at improving literacy through focusing on reading enjoyment.

Booktrust Chief Executive Diana Gerald believes passionately in reading for pleasure and and in an article about its value argues strongly for children reading what they like. Joy Ballard makes a similar case in ‘Let the teens read Mills and Boon!’ Katie Ashford of Michaela School takes a very different view in ‘Easy books aren’t the route to a lifelong love of reading’. Do read the comment stream beneath this controversial piece.

New research shows that there are lots of girls struggling with reading. The big concern is comprehension.

Secondary school teachers, librarians, students and parents will find lots of ideas for inspiring reading an innovative booklist created by the librarians at Elmgreen School.

Teacher Jesse Buetow’s piece on using technology to inspire independent readers explores the value of student-created book ‘commercials’.

A recent study found interesting differences between reading paper books and screen reading with young children.

It’s well worth listening to this Radio 4 piece on children and ebooks, particularly Julia Eccelshare’s input.

To end, another great quote from Obama: ‘Reading is the gateway skill that makes all other learning possible.’

Tuesday, 23 February 2016

Children’s and young people’s reading: recent news and views

dog readingLots of serious news and views to come, but I couldn’t resist starting with a story about a dog that’s learnt to read.

New OECD data tells us that young people in England have lowest literacy levels in developed world. As a trainer who specialises in children’s and young people’s reading, I am always keen to explore ways to make reading more accessible, attractive and worthwhile. Digital reading surely has a big part to play.

I felt very privileged to attend this fascinating debate on children’s reading in the digital age. Well worth watching, to find out how good use of technology has the power to bridge the alarming literacy gaps in the UK.

The National Literacy Trust reported in December that e-books make a particular difference to boys’ reading. The report prompted a BBC exploration of the place of e-books in schools.

A new survey by Booktrust found that families prefer printed books and lots of parents have qualms about digital reading. Chief executive Diana Gerald points out its benefits, when used in partnership with printed books.

I would completely agree with this, and we are immensely lucky in this country to have wonderful children’s books at our disposal.

Michael Rosen is fascinating on what children learn from picture books and how.

Here’s the Canadian Paediatric Society on why it’s never too early to start reading with children.

A recent study found that toddlers could be ready to begin reading lessons at 3. Without doubt we should encourage a love of books from babyhood onwards, but let’s make sure that’s what the emphasis is about, not reading lessons. I was very interested to read parent Sally Marks lamenting the focus on phonics drilling at home. ‘Let’s leave phonics to schools and curl up with a good book instead.’

If we want to ensure children feel positively about reading, we must of course read to them, and not just when they are very young. Do check out this inspirational TED talk by teacher Rebecca Bellingham on why it matters.

I also strongly recommend a great series of vlogs by author Phil Earle for Booktrust. I so agree with him that children need to be able to choose books that give them sense of achievement.

Like many others, I have a particular concern about comprehension. Lots of teachers on courses tell me about children who are excellent at decoding, but do not understand what they are reading. In which case, what’s the point? Here’s a useful blog about how to use questioning to support comprehension.

Study after study has proved that children and young people who enjoy reading read more and are better at it. Hardly surprising! It’s instructive to read this teenager’s view that students need to enjoy the books their GCSE books.

And here’s another valuable article from the Guardian children’s book site: Children’s books: a middle class ghetto?

Finally, on a much lighter note, the results of a poll about heroes and villains in children’s literature. I’m delighted to see Pooh and Paddington among the heroes. Cruella de Vil and Mrs Coulter are definitely my favourite villains.