Tag archives: quotes

Wednesday, 20 December 2017

Wonderful quotes about books and reading

Lana 1For my last blog of the year, some of my favourite quotes about books and reading, illustrated with one of my favourite family photos.

There are many ways to enlarge your child’s world. Love of books is the best of all. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. Philip Pullman

Stories can conquer fear, you know. They can make the heart bigger. Ben Okri

A book is a place where children can try on all the lives they haven’t got. Margaret Meek

Children’s books can be bridges connecting people. S F Said

Books allow you to see the world through the eyes of others. Reading is an exercise in empathy. Malorie Blackman

Great books help you understand, and they help you feel understood. John Green

Reading is the most powerful gift we can give a child: it puts stardust in their imaginations. Emma Cox

I guess that’s the beauty of books. When they finish they don’t really finish. Markus Zusak

Reading is a first class ticket to the outer limits of your imagination. Juno Dawson

Books are, let’s face it, better than everything else. Nick Hornby

You can find magic wherever you look. Sit back and relax, all you need is a book. Dr Seuss

Literacy is the bridge from misery to hope. Kofi Annan

Reading gives you knowledge, it gives you power. Andy McNabb

Our books and out pens are the most powerful weapons. Malala Yousafzai

Books are for life, not just for homework. Keith Gray

Read. Read anything… Just read. Neil Gaiman

Monday, 13 November 2017

Reading for information – inspiring quotes for National Non-Fiction November on fostering children’s curiosity

NFI’m delighted that one of the courses I’m giving this week is on reading for information, perfect in National Non-Fiction November. These are some of the great books we’ll be looking at, all brilliant for developing curiosity.

I love all the quotes here. They demonstrate the value and importance of nurturing enquiring minds, and give some useful pointers into how to do it – not least harnessing the power of libraries and librarians.

  • ‘I think, at a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity.’ Eleanor Roosevelt
  • ‘Curiosity is the engine of achievement.’ Ken Robinson
  • ‘The most reliable predictor of achievement is a hungry mind.’ Sophie von Stumm
  • ‘The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited.’ Plutarch
  • ‘Reading for information is about thinking, wondering, and sometimes understanding, with the ever-present possibility of being unsettled.’ Margaret Meek
  • ‘If we are to motivate children to go through the research process, then we must ensure that their curiosity is stimulated, by exposing them to new information or ideas that cause them to want to know more.’ Jeni Riley and David Reedy
  • ‘It is not the answer that enlightens but the question.’ Eugène Ionescu
  • ‘The essential move in learning is to transform information to understanding.’ Margaret Meek
  • ‘Libraries offer the arsenal in the war of understanding.’ Mal Peet
  • ‘Librarians open up the world. Knowledge is useless if you don’t even know where to begin to look. How much more can you discover when someone can point you in the right direction, when someone can maybe even give you a treasure map, to places you may not have even thought you were allowed to go? This is what librarians do.’ Patrick Ness
  • ‘The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.’ Dr Seuss

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Inspiring quotes for National Libraries Week

IMG_0930I am a passionate advocate of libraries. I know first hand their transformative power. I can’t let National Libraries Week go by without sharing a few of my favourite library quotes. And as illustration, here’s the wonderful Stockholm Central Library, which I was lucky enough to visit a few years ago.

‘Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life. Libraries change lives for the better.’ Sidney Sheldon

‘A library in the middle of a community is a cross between an emergency exit, a life-raft and a festival. They are cathedrals of the mind; hospitals of the soul; theme parks of the imagination.’ Caitlin Moran

‘A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up late reading them.’ Lemony Snicket

‘I see libraries and librarians as frontline soldiers in the war against illiteracy and the lack of imagination.’ Neil Gaiman

‘Libraries create readers. It’s that simple.’ Nicola Morgan

‘The way to get children reading is to leave the library door open and let them read anything and everything they want.’ Terry Pratchett

‘Get yourself down to the library and read a book.’ Alex Ferguson

‘You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books are the greatest weapons. This room’s the best arsenal we could have!’ Doctor Who

‘Reading is the centre of learning and libraries are at the heart of this.’ Gervase Phinn

‘For all those children out there who, like me, loved books and couldn’t afford to buy them, all I can say is thank God for our libraries …… Reading should and must be the right of all, not just a privilege for the few.’ Malorie Blackman

‘Shout for libraries. Shout for the young readers who use them.’ Patrick Ness

‘A library is a place where you can lose your innocence without losing your virginity.’ Germaine Greer

Tuesday, 11 October 2016

Children’s and young people’s mental health: how reading can help, plus booklists and quotes

img_3525Some time ago I did a fascinating and illuminating online course on literature and mental health. It’s still available. Doctors, celebrities and academics shared moving insights about the ways in which reading can help people struggling with depression and other debilitating mental health issues. Mental health problems among children and young people are horribly prevalent. As someone who specialises in children’s and young people’s reading, I am particularly interested in the role that books and reading can play in supporting them, and also in spreading understanding about the issues. In the words of Frank Cottrell Boyce, a book is ‘the knife that picks the lock of your isolation.’

I have found these articles and booklists informative and helpful:

Holly Bourne (author of the wonderful Am I Normal Yet?) has written an excellent piece on mental health issues in YA fiction.

Read what two teenagers with mental health problems have to say about the importance of books – and the paucity of provision – in ‘Mental health and books: teenagers speak out’.

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has a list of books for pre-school to 12 year-old children on a wide range of mental health concerns. Letterbox Library supplies a good range of children’s books on mental health issues. Have a look too at Booktrust’s list, which includes both children’s and young adult titles.

Do read about the Reading Well scheme to support young people’s mental health in libraries. There’s a useful guide to the books available, organised by issue (eg bullying, self-harm, OCD, body image and eating disorders).

Young Minds has a list of young adult books that reflect mental health issues. There’s another valuable booklist from Madeleine Kuderick, author of Kiss of Broken Glass.

A few more quotes to end. Shami Chakrabarti tells us ‘Reading can bring the breeze of hope’. This is John Green: ‘Great books help you understand, and they help you feel understood.’ Matt Haig, who writes so brilliantly about depression, says in Reasons to Stay Alive that reading is important ‘because it gives you room to exist beyond the reality you’re given. Reading makes the world better.’ Finally, here’s Ben Okri: ‘Stories can conquer fear, you know. They can make the heart bigger.

Thursday, 7 July 2016

Diversity and inclusion in children’s literature – with some great quotes on its importance

inclusive booksIt’s the UKLA international conference this weekend. The (wonderful and important) topic is literacy, equality and diversity. I’m giving a workshop on using inclusive books with 3-7 year-olds, and I’ve been packing up lots of great books. If space and weight weren’t at a premium, I would be taking many more.

I totally agree with Alexandra Strick of Inclusive Minds: ‘A good inclusive book is never issue-led, but is characterised by a great story; fully rounded characters; incidental, natural representation of issues; authenticity.’

Malorie Blackman says; ‘First and foremost, our children need and deserve great, entertaining stories. My wish is for a more diverse pool of writers, illustrators and poets catering to our children’s needs. Our children require a more varied selection of protagonists having amazing adventures.’

I love these quotes too about the importance of diversity in children’s literature:

‘All children have a right to see themselves and their experiences reflected in the books they read, as well as having books which open up new worlds, real and imaginary. This is not about political correctness, but about the need for books that reflect the reality of children’s lives.’ Anna McQuinn

‘When children see their lives reflected in the books they read, they feel they and their lives are not invisible.’ Malorie Blackman again

‘Children need to feel they belong.’ Beverley Naidoo

‘Let’s make our bookshelves reflect the diversity of our streets.’ Phil Earle

‘Books give a child a lever with which to prise open the world.’ Amanda Craig

‘A book is a place where children can try on all the lives they haven’t got.’ Margaret Meek