Tag archives: literacy

Monday, 19 April 2021

Children’s reading: latest news

Issy and Frankie

A new term, and a new round-up of news, research and articles on children’s reading. Many thanks to the kind librarian who sent me this wonderful photo of her book-loving children.

Very distressing news first: Covid may leave twelve million children globally unable to read, with girls particularly impacted.

Recently released PISA data demonstrates that students with a growth mindset score considerably higher in reading than students with a fixed mindset after accounting for the socio-economic profile of students and schools.

CLPE’s Reading for Pleasure 2021 report examines literacy teaching during the pandemic. The teachers surveyed worked hard to retain a reading for pleasure approach, but had big concerns about many children’s lack of access to books.

The ever-inspiring Marcus Rashford today launched a book club for disadvantaged children. He has teamed up with publishers MacMillan which will donate 50,000 books to be distributed in over 850 primary schools through the children’s food charity Magic Breakfast.

Waterstones Children’s Laureate Cressida Cowell, with the support of all her predecessor Laureates and the heads of virtually every reading-related organisation in England, has urged the Prime Minister to provide ring-fenced funds for school libraries to address the reading gap worsened by the pandemic.

I found ‘A reading curriculum: gap-widening vs gap-narrowing’ by teacher and writer David Didau thought-provoking and useful.

‘How children read differently from books vs screens’ also makes very interesting reading.

Finally, I loved ‘It takes a village to raise a reader’, a delightful piece about the power and influence of reading role models by Julia Marshall.

Monday, 27 January 2020

Children’s and young people’s reading – recent reports and research

IMG_3461The latest PISA report was published last month. These are some key national and international findings relating to reading:

  • The UK is now 13th in OECD in terms of 15 year-olds’ reading scores.
  • However pupils in all countries of the UK have more negative attitudes towards reading than the OECD average.
  • Less than 1 in 10 students in OECD countries is able to differentiate facts and opinions.
  • Girls significantly outperform boys in reading on average across OECD countries. The gender gap in the UK is less than the OECD average.

The World Bank and UN report that 90% of children in the world’s poorest countries cannot read a basic book by the age of 10 (whereas in rich countries only 9% cannot do so by the same age).

According to the International Literacy Association’s latest ‘What’s Hot in Literacy’ report the top five most critical issues in literacy education, as selected by respondents, are

  1. Building early literacy skills through a balanced approach that combines both foundational and language comprehension instruction
  2. Determining effective instructional strategies for struggling readers
  3. Increasing equity and opportunity for all learners
  4. Increasing professional learning and development opportunities for
    practicing educators
  5. Providing access to high-quality, diverse books and content

National Literacy Trust research shows that more than 380,000 children in the UK do not own a single book. It matters, because children who own books are six times more likely to read above the level expected for their age and nearly three times more likely to enjoy reading.

Children’s publisher Egmont has produced a paper on trends and challenges in reading for pleasure, based on extensive research. It identifies three key things that create an environment that discourages reading for pleasure:

  • School: the curriculum makes reading a subject to learn, not something to do for fun
  • Screens: increasing time on screen means less time for reading and other activities
  • Parents: lack of awareness that they need to read to their children beyond the point at which the child can read independently

The benefits of parents reading to children are of course well known. New research proves that children have sharper vocabulary skills by age 3 when parents read with them early on.

A recent study concludes that there is little or no evidence that teaching phonics improves reading.

Wednesday, 14 November 2018

Reading in the early years – links to useful websites, reports and books

you choose 1##I’m giving lots of courses on creating a love of books and reading in the early years at the moment. It’s one of my favourite training topics, and a crucial one. I will blog soon about why it is so important. Meanwhile, I thought it might be useful to share links to websites, research and books that I find particularly valuable. Many of these are relevant across the board, while some are particularly applicable to early years practitioners and teachers, some to librarians, some to parents and carers.

And what better way to illustrate the list than this fabulous photo of a 20 month-old, sent to me by a course participant last week.

Book Finder
Bookbug
Books for Keeps
Bookstart
Core Books Online
Developing Early Literacy 0-8: From Theory to Practice, ed Virginia Bower, Sage, 2014, ISBN 9781446255339
Digital Technology and the Early Years, National Literacy Trust, 2017
Early Literacy Practices at Home, National Literacy Trust, 2016
Federation of Children’s Books Groups
Foundations of Literacy, by Sue Palmer, Featherstone Education, 2013, ISBN 9781408193846
Healthy Books
Library Services from Birth to Five: Delivering the Best Start, ed Carolynn Rankin and Avril Brock, Facet Publishing, 2015, ISBN 9781783300082
Love My Books
Love Reading 4 Kids
Preparing for Literacy, Education Endowment Foundation, 2018
Read On Get On
Reading Zone
Rhyme Time and Seven Quality Principles Toolkit
Road to Reading, by Jillian Harker, Early Education, 2011
Universally Speaking – Ages and Stages of Children’s Communication Development for Children Aged Birth to 5, The Communication Trust, 2013
Words for Life

Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Children’s reading news – a round-up of recent research and articles

mso98AE2There’s been lots of reading-related news recently. This is my latest round-up, illustrated with a delightful old family photo.

New research highlights an increasing vocabulary deficiency in UK schools.

A study shows that the benefits of reading aloud to children include behaviour and attention.

‘Three strategies to engage primary pupils in reading’ looks at the importance of peer reading, regular read-alouds and auditing school reading materials.

An American expert suggests that reading aloud is valuable in high school for breaking down equity barriers.

‘Why do children read more? The influence of reading ability on voluntary reading practices’ is well worth looking at.

‘Reading for pleasure: a different king of rigour’ explores primary class provision that makes a difference.

‘What teachers need to know about shared reading’ explores the benefits of shared reading in the early years and beyond.

‘The 9 essential components of a KS2 reading scheme’ is useful. I would add an attractive, well-stocked and well-promoted school library to the list.

‘Why are boys from low income families more likely to disengage with reading?’ suggests teachers’ stereotypes can affect boys’ engagement with reading.

Here are a school librarian’s top tips for inspiring pupils to read.

Finally, do take a looks at these two videos, the first about how Eileen Littlewood, headteacher at Forthview Primary School, built a reading culture at her school and the second on how shared reading can help younger readers (and the older ones too).

Friday, 23 February 2018

Language and literacy news and articles

mso64805There have been lots of useful articles and reports about children’s language and literacy development and ways to support them published in the last couple of months. Here’s a round-up.

Important new research shows that engaging young children in conversation is more valuable for brain development than ‘dumping words’ on them.

An analysis has recently been published exploring whether screens help or hinder language development in the early years.

We know that children’s language and literacy is immensely enhanced by being read to, so it is sad to see that only half of pre-school children are being read to every day.

Reading aloud is of course not just important for young children. ‘Encouraging a love of reading in a culture of assessment’ by parent Brian Gesko is moving and valuable.

Disturbing National Literacy Trust research highlights a huge gap in life expectancy between children in areas of good and poor literacy.

Do read ‘The best way to start closing the attainment gap between poor kids and their peers? Reading, reading, reading’ by head teacher Colin Harris.

It’s also well worth looking at this article showing how literacy skills have significantly improved as a result of the reading for pleasure scheme in Renfrewshire primary schools.

Primary English lead Rachel Lopiccolo suggests five ways to boost reading for pleasure in primary schools.

There are valuable ideas in ‘Why every class needs read alouds’. I love this: ‘The read aloud is like the Swiss Army knife of literacy; it has multiple uses at every age and in every content area.’

The ever-useful Scottish Book Trust lists some creative ways to get primary children to respond to books.

‘Fascinating rhythm’ is interesting on the value of rhythm for dyslexic and other children for phonemic awareness, reading fluency and wider learning, and ways to embed it.

A new report that tells us secondary school students are reading well below their reading level has received considerable press coverage, for instance this Guardian piece. It’s important to note however that this research is based solely on data from the Accelerated Reader project, and many have questioned its accuracy as a national picture.

‘Don’t knock kids for rereading books. Encourage them to read, full stop’ is a thoughtful response to the report and its reception by the director of the English and Media Centre.