Category archives: reading promotion

Thursday, 9 May 2019

Children’s and young people’s reading – new research, articles and blogs

GreuzeI’m always drawn to pictures of children and books. I discovered this one by Jean Baptiste Greuze in the fascinating Painting Childhood exhibition at Compton Verney. A great illustration for my latest round-up of children’s reading news.

I was very pleased to see storytelling and reading encouraged in WHO guidelines on what under 5s need to grow up healthy.

A ‘Chat, play, read’ campaign has been announced to encourage learning at home.

The National Literacy Trust, in conjunction with OUP and the APPG on Literacy, has published Language Unlocks Reading: Supporting Early Language and Reading for Every Child.

A new survey shows that story time with e-books is not as helpful as with print books. Parents and children interact less when reading electronic books together than printed ones. However, not all studies come to the same conclusion on this.

According to research into 9-18 year-olds’ reading, reading both digital and print formats offers the highest benefit for young people’s literacy.

Another new report reveals a link between children’s reading skills and their ability to manage money.

Author Claire Barker has some useful insights about the power and value of comfort reads.

Primary teachers and librarians, have a look at Scott Evans’ inspiring ‘The rights of the reader teacher‘ (adapted from Daniel Pennac’s The Rights of the Reader).

‘The power of reading aloud’ on the Literacy with Miss P website has lots of useful information and ideas.

‘Forget the classics: let GCSE students read young-adult fiction’ by English teacher Andrew Otty is well worth a look.

Finally, do take a look at this inspiring story about a school which live-streams bedtime stories.

Friday, 8 March 2019

Children’s and young people’s reading – latest news and views

Max & Amazing BabyYou are never too young for books!

It’s a while since my last round-up of recent research and articles about children’s reading, and lots have come out since.

New studies reveal that the number of 8 to 18-year-olds reading for pleasure has dropped to 52.5%, down from 58.8% in 2016, with only a quarter reading daily, compared with 43% in 2015, and that only 32% of British children under 13 are read to daily by an adult for pleasure, 9 percentage points down on 2012.

According to the What Kids Are Reading 2019 report, only a quarter of pupils get the recommended daily time for reading for pleasure. (It’s important to know that this report only surveys children involved in the Accelerated Reader programme, and is not representative of all children or all schools.)

New research demonstrates that parents and carers who regularly read with small children give them a language advantage of eight months. The biggest difference is with receptive language skills, i.e. understanding. Socially disadvantaged children experience slightly more benefit than others.

A study into the Too Small to Fail campaign in the US shows that when doctors explain to parents the value of talking, reading and singing with their babies and children it has a major impact.

The International Literacy Association has produced a list of children’s rights to read. These are the stand-outs for me, none of them surprising, but all of them important to re-iterate:

  • Children have the basic human right to read.
  • Children have the right to choose what they read.
  • Children have the right to read texts that mirror their experiences and languages, provide windows into the lives of others, and open doors into our diverse world.
  • Children have the right to read for pleasure.
  • Children have the right to supportive reading environments with knowledgeable literacy partners.

Also from the ILA, ‘Creating passionate readers through independent reading’ has lots of useful information and ideas.

‘Comprehension is essential to phonics lessons, and picture books are a great place to start’ came out last summer, but I only came across it recently. Worthwhile reading for primary teachers.

Finally, there are lots of great ideas in this post from the Renfrewshire school that won the Literacy School of the Year award in 2018.

Friday, 14 December 2018

Children’s and young people’s reading – recent research and articles

family in Daunt BooksI loved seeing and hearing this family’s shared reading in a bookshop recently. What a perfect illustration for my latest round-up of reading news and views.

Author Cressida Cowell argues strongly that if we want our children to thrive, teaching them to read is not enough – they must learn to enjoy it.

‘When screens are more appealing than books, we need to teach children how to be biliterate’ is worth a read.

New research shows that the home literacy environment is a correlate, but perhaps not a cause, of variations in language and literacy development.

Another recent study highlights the importance of a book-rich home environment in adolescence. Teenagers in homes with almost no books went on to have below average literacy and numeracy levels, whereas teenagers with only lower levels of secondary education but who came from homes filled with books become as literate in adulthood as graduates who grew up with only a few books.

Young people who read fiction have significantly stronger reading skills than their peers who do not, according to new findings from the Institute of Education.

School librarian Sally Cameron’s article ‘Why incentivising reading does not work’ makes interesting reading.

Comprehension is a crucial aspect of reading skills. ‘Comprehension is a long and wide game’ by Simon Smith is interesting and useful. Michael Rosen’s blog ‘What does it mean to read and understand a text? The “reader-response” processes’ is packed with detailed ideas.

This month saw the release of the latest ROGO Index. The annual index brings together data on the reading skills, reading enjoyment and reading frequency of eleven year-olds. These are this year’s headline findings:

  • children’s daily reading levels have risen slightly since 2016/17
  • daily reading levels continue to be an area of great concern, lagging significantly behind levels of reading skill
  • levels of reading enjoyment have remained relatively unchanged
  • national curriculum reading scores increased by 3 percentage points over the past year while reading scores from GL Assessment and Renaissance have remained relatively stable
  • girls continue to outperform boys in all areas of reading, with a particularly marked gap in daily reading levels

Tuesday, 25 September 2018

Children need libraries – quotes on their importance

DSCF1083#The current downgrading and closures of both school and public libraries will have terrible consequences. Here are some potent quotes on the crucial role of libraries and librarians in creating readers and learners.

At the moment we persuade a child, any child, to cross that magic threshold into a library, we change their lives forever, for the better. Barack Obama

Research provides compelling evidence that library usage is linked to reading levels among children and young people, and that library usage and reading, in turn, are important factors in literacy skill levels and general educational attainment. Evidence Review of the Economic Contribution of Libraries

The education that mattered most to me began when my mother first took me to the public library and I registered for my own hallowed ticket. Will Self 

Once a child learns to use a library, the doors to learning are always open. Laura Bush

Libraries are browsing places, dreaming places, finding out places. So much education takes place when children are making choices of their own. Michael Morpurgo

The child who knows his/her way round the library is the one most likely to become an avid reader. Wendy Cooling

For all those children out there who, like me, loved books and couldn’t afford to buy them, all I can say is thank God for our libraries …… Reading should and must be the right of all, not just a privilege for the few. Malorie Blackman

Reading is the centre of learning and libraries are at the heart of this. Gervase Phinn

I see libraries and librarians as frontline soldiers in the war against illiteracy and the lack of imagination. Neil Gaiman

Librarians open up the world ……. How much more can you discover when someone can point you in the right direction, when someone can maybe even give you a treasure map, to places you may not have even thought you were allowed to go? This is what librarians do. Patrick Ness

Librarians are the custodians of literacy – they lay the stepping stones that start the journey from one book to another, widening horizons and the reading experience. Chris Riddell

The way to get children reading is to leave the library door open and let them read anything and everything they want. Terry Pratchett

Even the most misfitting child
Who’s chanced upon the library’s worth
Sits with the genius of the Earth
And turns the key to the whole world.
from ‘Hear it Again’ Ted Hughes

Tuesday, 4 September 2018

Children’s reading: research, tips and articles

adult & girl in FoylesA new term, and there’s lots of children’s reading news and views to catch up on, illustrated with a lovely scene in a bookshop yesterday.

‘Digital text is changing how kids read, just not in the way that you think’ looks at the differences between online and print reading, and their relative merits.

‘Yes, teens are texting and using social media instead of reading books’ explores the impact and the prevalence of online reading in relation to teenagers.

In ‘Skim reading is the new normal’ reading expert Maryanne Wolf (author of Proust and the Squid) discusses the effect of digital reading on the brain.

A new study shows for the first time that heavy use of social media by children has been linked to lower levels of literacy.

‘Can you really teach children to love reading’ has lots of very useful tips. Libraries are rightly given a high profile.

There are loads of great ideas in children’s author Andy Seed’s Reading for Pleasure Manifesto. Highly recommended.

Have a look too at Elizabeth Hutchinson’s valuable blog on reading initiatives.

I found ‘How drama helps primary children understand books and stories’ interesting and useful.

‘Make sure your class book is age-appropriate’ examines the potential harm of teaching books that are beyond children’s age range.

‘Don’t bloody bore them: a guide to picking books for your class’ is well worth a read.

Finally, an inspiring story courtesy of the Guardian: ‘No turban, no sermon, just books for kids: meet Iran’s travelling cleric’.