Wednesday, 22 September 2021

Children’s reading news – latest guidelines, research and articles

basketI’m looking forward to getting my hundreds of children’s books properly sorted. I moved over the summer, hence this later than usual round-up of reading-related reports and articles.

The Government’s new publication The Reading Framework: teaching the foundations of literacy is essential reading for teachers and others supporting children in reception and year 1, and for those involved with older children who have not yet mastered the foundations of reading. Good to see the emphasis placed on reading for pleasure and the importance of stories and book talk.

School librarians and others will find lots of practical advice on promoting reading in ‘How to encourage reading for pleasure on a budget’.

‘Reading for kids – Tips for keeping them interested’ also has useful ideas.

New National Literacy Trust research shows that in-game communication is the second most popular form of on-screen reading among young people, and that young people enjoy playing video games alongside (rather than at the expense of) activities such as reading, writing, physical activity and socialising.

Another recent Literacy Trust survey found that listening to audiobooks is a popular activity that increases children’s interest in books and in diversity, and is good for wellbeing.

A new report shows how audiobooks can help build reading engagement with younger children, particularly around interaction, complementing other forms of storytelling.

Booktrust is piloting a new national library experience called BookTrust Storytime, to support families with 0-5 year-olds, particularly those who are disadvantaged, engage with their local public library and develop an ongoing reading habit.

Research shows that writing by hand benefits the development of reading skills.

There are links between mathematical difficulty and poor language skills.

Finally, a good piece by Lauren Child on why children’s books should be taken seriously.

Friday, 28 May 2021

Children’s reading news update

hungry caterpillarSo sad that the legendary Eric Carle has died. His wonderful, ground-breaking books have lit up the lives of generations of children all over the world.

It was wonderful to hear Marcus Rashford talking about his belief in the power of books and reading and his mission to get children reading on Channel 4 News last week. I also loved this snippet from a Zoom call between him and Barack Obama, in which they discussed the magic of books. ‘Rather than someone telling me to do this and do that, books allowed me to do it my own way’ said Rashford.

The latest PISA report ’21st Century Readers’ has important and interesting findings, including lots about the need for critical reading skills and the extent to which these are taught and learnt across OECD countries, and about reading gaps relating to gender and to socio-economic background.

New research indicates that children read more challenging books in lockdowns.

‘Literacy by stealth: How video games can make a difference’ is well worth reading.

‘The Benefits of Reading for Fun’ demonstrates the academic impact of reading for pleasure. Making sure students have rich and varied reading diets and can exercise choice are key.

If you haven’t yet come across it yet, do take a looks at this useful Reading for Pleasure padlet.

The new Decade of Diversity initiative is a campaign to advance diversity and inclusion in schools. One of its aims is to ensure 25% diverse literature in schools by 2030.

Finally, a pleasing suggestion in the Guardian: as online social interaction has been found to help protect older people against dementia, reading bedtime stories to grandchildren over Zoom has even more benefits than we knew.

Monday, 19 April 2021

Children’s reading: latest news

Issy and Frankie

A new term, and a new round-up of news, research and articles on children’s reading. Many thanks to the kind librarian who sent me this wonderful photo of her book-loving children.

Very distressing news first: Covid may leave twelve million children globally unable to read, with girls particularly impacted.

Recently released PISA data demonstrates that students with a growth mindset score considerably higher in reading than students with a fixed mindset after accounting for the socio-economic profile of students and schools.

CLPE’s Reading for Pleasure 2021 report examines literacy teaching during the pandemic. The teachers surveyed worked hard to retain a reading for pleasure approach, but had big concerns about many children’s lack of access to books.

The ever-inspiring Marcus Rashford today launched a book club for disadvantaged children. He has teamed up with publishers MacMillan which will donate 50,000 books to be distributed in over 850 primary schools through the children’s food charity Magic Breakfast.

Waterstones Children’s Laureate Cressida Cowell, with the support of all her predecessor Laureates and the heads of virtually every reading-related organisation in England, has urged the Prime Minister to provide ring-fenced funds for school libraries to address the reading gap worsened by the pandemic.

I found ‘A reading curriculum: gap-widening vs gap-narrowing’ by teacher and writer David Didau thought-provoking and useful.

‘How children read differently from books vs screens’ also makes very interesting reading.

Finally, I loved ‘It takes a village to raise a reader’, a delightful piece about the power and influence of reading role models by Julia Marshall.

Wednesday, 17 March 2021

Children’s reading news, research, resources

A shelves

It’s a long time since my last blog on news from the world of children’s reading. These are some things that have particularly caught my attention.

Research by the World Book Day charity, which brings together the UK’s leading reading and educational charities, shows that children and parents embraced reading at the start of the pandemic, with major benefits in terms of wellbeing and development, although one year on reading has decreased slightly. Parents read more with children during lockdown and encouraged children to read more too. ‘Whilst engaging children with their online lessons often became a battleground for families, parents who read aloud to their children every day noticed an improvement in wellbeing, behaviour, family bonds and attainment with schoolwork (even when home educating).’ Young people said reading helped them relax and made them feel happy. Over 80% of teachers said they found ways of reading aloud to their classes during the pandemic because it provided an emotional support as well as developing literacy skills. A much less positive finding was that access to books remains a serious issue, particularly amongst disadvantaged children and families.

The headlines about the latest Childwise survey focused on the finding that 25% of children never read for pleasure. A different, and equally valid take is that 75% do. Reading for pleasure peaks at ages 9-10 apparently.

A report by the Education Endowment Foundation found that disadvantaged primary school pupils are seven months behind their peers in reading, although it urged caution over the findings.

Leading organisations and individuals in the fields of literacy, education and the arts have joined CLPE and Fair Education Alliance in a call for long term, sustained funding for rich literacy provision. ‘Catch up’ should not be limited to functional skills, they stress.

The National Literacy Trust report Seeing yourself in what you read: diversity and children and young people’s reading in 2020 found that nearly a third of 9-18 year-olds don’t see themselves in what they read, with a higher proportion among those from ethnic minority backgrounds. Almost 40% would like more books with characters like them. More children and young people who receive free school meals than those who don’t say that they don’t see themselves in what they read. The issue of representation was particularly salient for children and young people who describe their gender not as a boy or girl.

Early learning and child well-being : a study of five-year-olds in England, Estonia, and the United States contains lots relating to literacy including:

  • Emergent literacy correlates positively with emergent numeracy and also self-regulation skills, empathy and social behaviour.
  • Emergent literacy impacts on later school achievement.
  • In the early years, the most important components of emergent literacy are listening comprehension, vocabulary and phonological awareness.
  • What parents do is pivotal for their children’s development.
  • Girls do better in emergent literacy.
  • Children in England from families with a migrant background had lower emergent literacy scores than those from non-immigrant backgrounds, even after adjusting for socio-economic status and home language.
  • Children with learning difficulties and children with social, emotional or behavioural difficulties had lower mean scores in both emergent literacy than children without these difficulties, after accounting for SES.
  • The use of digital devices had little overall significant associations with children’s emergent literacy.

If you missed it at the time, my blog reflecting on a recent study on improving mathematics in early years and KS1 explores the value of using books to support teaching and learning across the curriculum.

Turn on the Subtitles is well worth a look. The research into the value of subtitles is compelling.

Finally, some recommendations for anyone interested in reading for pleasure:

Thursday, 4 February 2021

The value of books and reading for children’s mental health

children's mental health weekIt’s Children’s Mental Health Week. Sadly the impact of Covid has made the week more vital than ever before. It feels appropriate to explore the benefits books and reading can offer.

There is a proven correlation between reading, mental health and wellbeing. Here are some key research findings:

Books and reading can help children feel good about themselves. The finding that they can reduce stress is so pertinent right now. These views come from children of 7, 9, 12, and 15 years of age:

I love reading books. They cheer me up.

I read sometimes to get out of the real world or if I am unhappy.

I like reading books a lot. I can get away from reality for a while and enjoy myself.

Reading takes you away from real life for a bit. I just love it.

A survey carried out in the first lockdown found that audiobooks also support children’s wellbeing.

Books help children realise that they are not alone. These words from Frank Cottrell Boyce very much resonate with me:

A book is not a learning resource. It’s the knife that picks the lock of your isolation.

I concur with this too, from Emily Drabble of Booktrust:

Story characters can be models for your child, which can help foster coping skills and build confidence.

Children’s author Tom Perceval says this:

It’s important for children, and their parents, to be offered books that might help them navigate their emotional journeys.

I agree. Books are powerhouses of emotional support. They build resilience too.

I mentioned research about reading and empathy. Empathy impacts on well-being, and reading is a great way to strengthen it. Here is Malorie Blackman:

Books allow you to see the world through the eyes of others. Reading is an exercise in empathy; an exercise in walking in someone else’s shoes for a while.

This reflection comes from a child in year 5:

When I feel empathy in stories, I slow down; sometimes I stop and think so much more.

Books and reading develop children’s (and adults’) understanding of themselves, of others and of the world. Children’s author and ex-headteacher Bernard Ashley makes this point:

Books can answer questions we do not know we’re asking.

Books can challenge attitudes and change views. Author SF Said says this:

Children’s books can be bridges connecting people, showing them that however different someone else might be, the things which unite us are greater than those which divide us. And that difference can be a source of richness: something to be celebrated, not feared.

My final quote is from a child in key stage 2, in a review of Brightstorm by Vashti Hardy:

This book has inspired me to follow my dreams.

There is no doubt that books and reading aid children’s mental health. I will blog soon on the sorts of books that can make a difference to their wellbeing, and effective ways to use them. Meantime, I recommend these links, the last three particularly for school librarians: