Thursday, 12 October 2017

Inspiring quotes for National Libraries Week

IMG_0930I am a passionate advocate of libraries. I know first hand their transformative power. I can’t let National Libraries Week go by without sharing a few of my favourite library quotes. And as illustration, here’s the wonderful Stockholm Central Library, which I was lucky enough to visit a few years ago.

‘Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life. Libraries change lives for the better.’ Sidney Sheldon

‘A library in the middle of a community is a cross between an emergency exit, a life-raft and a festival. They are cathedrals of the mind; hospitals of the soul; theme parks of the imagination.’ Caitlin Moran

‘A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up late reading them.’ Lemony Snicket

‘I see libraries and librarians as frontline soldiers in the war against illiteracy and the lack of imagination.’ Neil Gaiman

‘Libraries create readers. It’s that simple.’ Nicola Morgan

‘The way to get children reading is to leave the library door open and let them read anything and everything they want.’ Terry Pratchett

‘Get yourself down to the library and read a book.’ Alex Ferguson

‘You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books are the greatest weapons. This room’s the best arsenal we could have!’ Doctor Who

‘Reading is the centre of learning and libraries are at the heart of this.’ Gervase Phinn

‘For all those children out there who, like me, loved books and couldn’t afford to buy them, all I can say is thank God for our libraries …… Reading should and must be the right of all, not just a privilege for the few.’ Malorie Blackman

‘Shout for libraries. Shout for the young readers who use them.’ Patrick Ness

‘A library is a place where you can lose your innocence without losing your virginity.’ Germaine Greer

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Children’s and young people’s reading – latest news and articles

Wilstead booksSome of the wonderful books we explored on an inset I gave on Monday on reading for pleasure. (Perfect topic for the start of the academic year.)

Lots of news and articles about children’s reading came out over the summer. Do hope this round-up is useful.

An American study shows that the benefits of reading to babies last for years.

New research shows the importance of oral vocabulary for reading: children find it easier to read words they have heard before, even if they’ve never seen them written down.

I was very interested to read Kate Nation’s views on the necessity for good comprehension strategies to complement phonics teaching in early years.

Primary teachers, do also look at this helpful, nuanced review of the relative merits of whole class reading teaching and guided reading. (My last news round-up has links to a couple of other valuable articles on this topic.)

Lots of good ideas in ‘Six steps to create a reading culture in your school’. Great to see school libraries and librarians (appropriately) valued.

‘What works for getting kids to enjoy reading’ has some interesting data and ideas, particularly about rewards for reading and easy access to books.

This useful blog on reading interventions argues that all interventions must be appropriate to the individual, for instance that a phonics-based approach will not help a successful decoder who struggles with comprehension.

Finally, an intriguing discovery: only human protagonists in children’s books impact on children’s social behaviour, not animal ones.

 

Thursday, 3 August 2017

Some fabulous picture books

SloughIt was lovely to see this girl immersed in her picture book during a library visit last week. And what a fantastic time it is for picture books. These have particularly delighted, impressed, moved and/or intrigued me in recent months. (Not all are new, just newish discoveries for me.)

A Lion in Paris by Beatrice Alamagna
Quiet by Katie Alizadeh
Sam and Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen
Welcome by Barroux
Ada Twist Scientist by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts
The Fox and the Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith
Baking with Dad by Aurora Cacciapuoti
The Cloud by Hannah Cumming
King of the Sky by Nicola Davies and Laura Carlin
The Pond by Nicola Davies and Cathy Fisher
If I Had a Dinosaur by Gabby Dawnay and Alex Barrow
The Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers
I am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon and Vivianne Schwarz
The Knight Who Wouldn’t Fight by Helen Docherty and Thomas Docherty
The Everywhere Bear by Julia Donaldson and Rebecca Cobb
The Boy Who Lost His Bumble by Trudi Esberger
A Child of Books by Oliver Jeffers and Sam Winston
Here I Am by Patti Kim and Sonia Sánchez
15 Things Not to Do with a Granny by Margaret McAllister and Holly Sterling
Zeki Can Swim by Anna McQuinn and Ruth Hearson
The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield
My Name is Not Refugee by Kate Milner
One Cheetah One Cherry by Jackie Morris
Ossiri and the Bala Mengro by Katharine Quarmby and Richard O’Neill
The Journey by Francesca Sanna
Mi and Museum City by Linda Sarah
How to Find Gold by Viviane Schwarz
A Rainbow in My Pocket by Ali Seidabadi and Hoda Haddadi
Grandpa Green by Lane Smith
How to Hide a Lion at School by Helen Stephens
There’s a Tiger in the Garden by Lizzie Stewart
Sun by Sam Usher

Friday, 7 July 2017

School libraries and librarians and their importance

new milton bus

This is the fabulous library at New Milton Primary School.

I believe passionately in the value of school libraries and librarians. In the last couple of years a number of schools have made their librarians redundant, a truly shocking act that will have long-term consequences for children’s reading and wider learning. Budgets for libraries have diminished drastically in all too many schools, again something that will have a big negative effect.

Last week saw the publication of a valuable literature review of school libraries, exploring current provision in the UK and evidence of school library impact. It demonstrates clearly the benefits of an effective school library and librarian in relation to reading skills and enjoyment; wider attainment; attitudes to learning; resilience; independence; self-esteem. There is a useful run-down of the elements of good school libraries. (Librarians come top of the list.)

For those who haven’t seen it, this is an excellent outline of the role of the school librarian by Alison Tarrant, School Librarian of the Year 2016.

On Principals Know: School Librarians are the Heart of the School several US school principals talk about the importance of school libraries and librarians.

Here is author Cathy Cassidy on the transformative impact of school libraries and school librarians: ‘Where there is a school library – and that mythical, magical creature, a school librarian – there is hope .…. School libraries are awesome. They are a refuge for the lost, the lonely; a haven for the bookworm; a hotbed of creativity, revolution and adventure. School libraries often contain book clubs and cake and laughter, as well as shelf after shelf of brilliant stories, dreams, other worlds. They teach young people how to find their wings and fly, and without them we’d be lost.’

There are links to more articles and reports on my previous blogs on school libraries.

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

A round-up of recent news and articles about children’s and young people’s reading

manchester girl readingI’ve always loved the Reading Girl statue by Giovanni Ciniselli in Manchester Central Library. The perfect illustration for my latest haul of children’s reading news.

The National Literacy Trust’s important annual literacy survey has just been published. Great to see that rates of reading for pleasure continue to rise. Sadly, though, 40% of 8-18 year-olds enjoy reading little or not at all, with significantly more boys than girls in this camp, far more secondary age students than key stage 2 pupils, and more pupils from white ethnic backgrounds than other ethnic backgrounds. Pupils who enjoy reading were found, not surprisingly, to spend more time reading, to read more widely, to have higher reading scores and better comprehension.

Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boost. Shared book-reading that begins soon after birth may translate into higher language and vocabulary skills before elementary school, according to US research.

Children’s reading improves if parents have positive views about their potential and are given ways to support reading effectively at home. A new survey shows big benefits to funding parental support for reading, especially for boys.

There are lots of excellent tips for raising a reader from the New York Times.

Do listen to Dr Vivienne Smith talking about why reading is important, not least for empathy and mental health.

Author and former teacher Jo Cotterill has great ideas for developing reading for pleasure. I also recommend this Scottish Book Trust blog on the subject.

A tweet by year 5 teacher Lauren Butterworth demonstrates how important it is to model reading behaviour: ‘The biggest influence on reading for pleasure in my class has been me reading – the kids love asking me questions.’

‘The essential components of a KS2 reading scheme’ is full of valuable pointers. The final essential on the list? A teacher who loves reading.

One of my greatest joys at primary school was when teachers read to us, and I loved it especially when it happened outside. A recent article explores the value of taking reading lessons into the open air.

Many primary schools are moving away from the carousel guided reading model. For teachers looking for guidance on this ‘How I teach whole class reading’ is useful, as is ‘ How to switch to whole class guided reading’.

Boys’ reading attainment is frequently addressed. A recent article suggests that girls’ reading problems often fall beneath the radar.

An anonymous English teacher ponders on the implications of the lack of reading by English teachers. It’s well worth reading the comments too, and this response from another English teacher.

New research demonstrates that children’s learning and comprehension do not differ between printed and digital books. Comprehension is dependent on content, not medium.

‘Inappropriate content’ is a useful discussion between an author and a bookseller about why age banding children’s books is unhelpful.

Last but definitely not least, an inspiring animation from We Love Reading.